DFC Stewardship Report 2020

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P R E PA R I N G T O L E A D OU R F U T U R E I S I N GOOD H A N D S

Closing the gap in higher education and the workforce is a bold mission that we embrace at Dougherty Family College. Our graduation rate is twice as high as the state and national community college graduation rates. In addition, our scholars gain valuable professional skills and experience by working at companies and organizations that make a meaningful impact in our society. Although 2020 has been a challenging year for many students due to the pandemic, our DFC students are steadfast in their commitment to fulfilling their college dreams and becoming leaders who will transform the world. We are grateful for our friends and partners who continue to support our scholars on their educational and career journey. Your dedicated partnership and consistent engagement with our scholars matter and will have an impact in their lives and in our communities for generations to come.

Deep Gratitude,

Buffy Smith, Ph.D. Interim Dean, Dougherty Family College

Students come from 62 different high schools

Students are set up for success from day one. They are immersed in a cohort model of instruction that fosters a sense of belonging to a community and life-long friendships. Moreover, cohorts support diversity of thought and provide students with real-world experiences. Small class sizes ensure all students participate in discussions and receive personal attention from professors. Each student is assigned a mentor who meets weekly with them to make sure that nothing gets in the way of their academic goals. S C HOO L R U L E S D I V E R S I T Y, EQU I T Y A N D I N C L U S I ON

78% are the first in their families to attend college

15+ languages spoken

96% are students of color

87% eligible for Pell Grants

DFC sits below these enormous skyscrapers filled with executives from Fortune 500 companies. Not many of them are led by people of color. I believe that DFC is going to change that, and I can’t wait until the day that those offices are filled with Dougherty Family College grads – students of color, first-generation college students, students with DACA status, students who lived in refugee camps, diehard Northsiders who grew up just a few blocks away – these are the students we need to see there. – Alvin Abraham

Hardworking and determined. These are shared traits among the DFC inaugural class of 2017. Nothing could get in the way of them achieving their goals. The pursuit of academic excellence continues with the graduating class of 2020 – Even a global pandemic couldn’t trip up these students. In May of 2020, 78 DFC students were awarded associate degrees. Thanks to the generous endowments established by Eugene and Mary Frey and the estate of Martin Ryan and Richard Sterbenz and others, 19 of these our outstanding graduates received full-tuition Excellence Scholarships to continue their studies at St. Thomas in pursuit of a bachelor’s degree. DFC is committed to ensuring that all students graduate from its program with little to no debt. This means we rely upon student-paid tuition, state and federal dollars, and philanthropic contributions. Our goal is to raise $50 million through philanthropy by 2027. To date, we’ve raised a total of $34 million. We are inspired by our hardworking students and the outpouring of support from the community in our fundraising efforts. EVEN A GLOBAL PANDEMI C COULDN ’ T TR I P UP THESE STUDENTS

Dougherty Family College Founding Dean, and Eugene and Mary Frey Endowed Chair

19 grads received full-tuition Excellence Scholarships to St. Thomas

“The donors want to see us succeed. They want to hear our stories and what brought us to DFC.”

$34M raised towards $50M goal

- Brianna King ’19 AA

100 alumni currently enrolled in bachelor’s programs

U N C O M M O N P A R T N E R S F O R T H E C O M M O N G O O D

I T ’ S NO T P U R E LY AC A D E M I C P R O F E S S I ON A L I N T E R N S H I P P R OG R AM

L E A D C O R P O R A T E P A R T N E R S

Dougherty Family College empowers students with practical know-how by providing learning opportunities outside the classroom through our Professional Internship Program. The exposure to the business world prepares students to develop professional skills, build relationships and gain real-world experience while exposing them to different industries and careers. The program is made possible because of the support from our corporate and non-profit partners, including financial and time commitments.

Every DFC student has the opportunity to participate in the Professional Internship Program.

S U P P O R T I N G C O R P O R A T E P A R T N E R S

“It’s not enough to just give money. You have to be

intentional about how you support and how you lift young people up. We not only talk the talk, but we wanted to walk it as well.” – Greg Cunningham, senior vice president and chief diversity officer, U.S. Bank

I N T E R N S H I P P A R T N E R S

Aon APi Group Best Buy Black Men Teach Blue Grotto Children’s Minnesota CommonBond Communities GHR Foundation HealthPartners

KIPP Minnesota MEDA M Health Fairview Northwest Area Foundation

Room & Board Schwan’s Company Securian Finanancial Star Manufacturing St. Paul Public Schools The Opus Group University of St. Thomas Wildflower Schools Winnebago Industries

Pohlad Companies Prodeo Academy PwC Regions Hospital Rêve Academy

All DFC corporate partners are also internship partners.

D E A M O N T E B L O C K ‘ 1 9 A A U . S . B A N K I N T E R N M I N N E T O N K A H I G H S C H O O L My internship at U.S. Bank taught me professionalism, for sure. I learned how to carry myself. I was encouraged to be myself, including how I chose to dress. I could look and act professional and still be me. Buffy Smith always mentions the importance of personal brand. So, I always ask myself, ‘What do I want people to see?’ I can be myself. When you accept yourself, you have the confidence to take on new things.

B A N K I N G O N A B R I G H T F U T U R E

K H A D R A S H A R I F ’ 2 1 A A T A R G E T I N T E R N C O O P E R H I G H S C H O O L

My internship at Target Headquarters has helped me develop knowledge about every department, from being a barista to general merchandising. I’ve learned about backroom operations, guest services, order pick- up and fulfillment. My mentor also helped me with my agenda and journey through the day, so I understood how to navigate the workplace and what to expect from my meetings. I have a lot of knowledge!

B O R N T O L E A D

Y E A B S I R A T E K E S T E ‘ 21 A A M AY O C L I N I C I N T E R N H I G H L A N D P A R K H I G H S C H O O L The opportunity to have an internship at the Mayo Clinic my first year of college is why I chose DFC. I’ve made good connections. I’m surrounded by physical therapists along with students who are in rotations. Each day, I learn something new or gain a valuable insight regarding where I want my path to lead me. I’m able to ask many questions about everything related to physical therapy. My future is starting to make sense.

C O N N E C T I N G I T A L L T O G E T H E R

B R E N D A S A U C E D O ‘ 1 9 A A 3 M I N T E R N WA S H I N G T O N T E C H I did administrative assistant work in my internship with 3M. I also had the opportunity to help build an application process for a Lego Robotics grant for under-resourced schools . I spent a few months thinking of the best questions to ensure the schools that really needed financial assistance would get it.

B U I L D I N G O P P O R T U N I T Y

DFC F O U N D I N G D O N O R S

Rebecca B. and John N. Allen Raymond L. and Mary L. Barton Curtis L. Carlson Family Foundation Margaret A. Cargill Foundation Andrew and Kathleen Cecere Michael V. and Ann C. Ciresi Foundation Mike and Kathy Dougherty Dougherty Family Foundation Dr. Eugene U. and Dr. Mary F. Frey

James P. Gearen GHR Foundation Gary S. Holmes David and Sheila Juran

G I V I NG UP I SN ’ T AN OPT I ON BUT G I V I NG I S A LWAY S AP P R EC I AT ED

The magnificent support of benefactors Mike and Kathy Dougherty and many corporate partners allowed the University of St. Thomas to dream of a new type of opportunity for students whose avenues to a college education are limited. The generous gifts are bringing the advantage of higher education within reach to a greater portion of our community.

Mary Jo and Robert G. Loftus Susan S. and John M. Morrison Rosa F. Malcka Miller Jami and Stephen Nachtsheim Opus Foundation Michael and Mary Ann Rouleau Pat and Ann Ryan T. Denny Sanford Julie and Bob Sullivan Anthony K. Seck and Reynee K. Tung

After Mike left the barracks, he returned to St. Thomas for a second chance. This was it. He could slack off and screw up again – or he could apply himself. Well, we all know that Mike seized his opportunity and succeeded. Mike and his wife Kathy have repaid that kindness with their transformational naming gift. DFC gives students who may not get a fair shot at college a chance to apply and develop their talents so they can make a difference in the world – and pay it forward just like Mike. Our heartfelt thanks go out to Mike and Kathy Dougherty and the many major donors who are helping to eliminate the college education gap in Minnesota.

What possibly could a septuagenarian like Mike Dougherty have in common with an 18-year-old DFC student? Well, more than you might think. In fact, when you put Snapchat aside and simply chat with Mike Dougherty, you learn that discipline is something they share in spades. Mike had to overcome plenty of challenges as a young person, including being orphaned at age 14, struggling with dyslexia, getting expelled from college (twice) and making it through the United States Army with all his digits and limbs attached. Like our DFC students, Mike never gave up. He worked hard because, as he said, “I saw how people who didn’t apply their God-given talents ended up.”

– Julie H. Sullivan, President

link.stthomas.edu/dfcimpact

The University of St. Thomas is an equal opportunity educator and employer. St. Thomas does not unlawfully discriminate, in any of its programs or activities, on the basis of race, color, creed, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, family status, disability, age, marital status, status with regard to public assistance, membership or activity in a local commission, genetic information or any other characteristic protected by applicable law. stthomas.edu/eostatement All programs offered by the University of St. Thomas shall be readily accessible to individuals with disabilities. For details, call (651) 962-6315.

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