CASM Grad Music Course Catalog 2022

M U S I C

g r a d u a t e p r o g r a m s i n m u s i c e d u c a t i o n

SUMMER 2022 COURSE SCHEDULE

GraduatePrograms inMusic Education College of Arts and Sciences

raise th BRING A HIGHER STANDARD OF PROFESSIONALISM TOMUSIC EDUCATION BY BECOMING PART OF A COMMITTED COMMUNITY OF EDUCATORS AT ST. THOMAS.

MASTER OF ARTS IN MUSIC EDUCATION Choral Instrumental

CERTIFICATES IN • World Music • Piano Pedagogy • Eurhythmics • 50+ nondegree courses/workshops to facilitate lifelong learning Orff Schulwerk Piano Pedagogy Kodály he bar

In our graduate programs, you’ll work closely with internationally recognized faculty – many of whom teach in elementary and secondary schools – to experience inspired teaching, to collaborate in creating music and movement, and to deepen your understanding of educational philosophies to reach all learners. You’ll energize your teaching by mastering new possibilities in music education, and you’ll have the foundation to earn a doctorate if you choose.

The Jane Frazee Distinguished Scholar-Artist Series

Jane Frazee Distinguished Scholar-Artist Series The 2022 distinguished scholar-artist is Dr. Juliet Hess .

MUSIC EDUCATION FOR SOCIAL CHANGE:

CONSTRUCTING AN ACTIVIST MUSIC EDUCATION This workshop examines the philosophies of 20 activist-musicians and considers their ideas about PK-12 school music education. Participants will explore the tenets of a tri-faceted pedagogy for music education. The first facet, a Pedagogy of Community,

emphasizes building community locally, connecting musics to their socio-historical contexts, and connecting with others through music. The second facet, a Pedagogy of Expression, focuses on honoring students’ realities through culturally responsive teaching and subsequently inviting them to share their experiences through songwriting. The third facet, a Pedagogy of Noticing, centers critical thinking in music education and encourages a “culture of questioning” (Giroux & Giroux, 2004). Together, we will consider what this tri-faceted pedagogy might mean for music education. Dr. Juliet Hess is an associate professor of music education at Michigan State University, having previously taught elementary and middle school music in Toronto. Her book, Music Education for Social Change: Constructing an Activist Music Education , explores the intersection of activism, critical pedagogy and music education. Her second book, Trauma and Resilience in Music Education: Haunted Melodies , is an edited volume co- edited with Deborah Bradley. Juliet received her PhD in Sociology of Education from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto. Her research interests include anti-oppression education, trauma-informed pedagogy, activism in music and music education, music education for social justice, disability and Mad studies, and the question of ethics in world music study.

Sunday, July 17, 2022 from 1-4:30 p.m. University of St. Thomas, James B. Woulfe Alumni Hall at the Anderson Student Center

2115 Summit Ave., St. Paul Free and open to the public.

GPME poster session and reception 4:30-5:15 p.m., ASCWoulfe Foyer. Master of Arts in Music Education students present posters describing research they have done. Reception open to the Jane Frazee Distinguished Scholar-Artist Series and poster session attendees.

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DEGREE OFFERINGS:

COURSES FOR EVERYONE

AFRICANMUSIC ENSEMBLE GMUS 671 (2 credits) Sowah Mensah June 21-24 | 9 a.m.-2 p.m.

EdD IN LEADERSHIPWITH A CONCENTRATION INMUSIC EDUCATION ADMISSIONDEADLINES Early consideration: Nov. 15 July cohort: March 15 MASTER OF ARTS INMUSIC EDUCATION • Choral concentration • Instrumental concentration • Kodály concentration

Study of traditional African music (Ghanaian culture) through music performance. Performance of chants, songs, music for social and festive occasions, and other vocal and instrumental examples selected from a variety of styles. Classes will focus on learning the music so that students will be able to teach it to their own students. Instrumental music will include drumming, xylophone (gyil or Orff) music and adenkum (gourd stamping tube). All instruments provided except flute and CDs, which can be purchased in class. DALCROZEMUSICIANSHIP GMUS 651 (3 credits) Kathy Thomsen, DMA, Dalcroze License June 13-24, 9 a.m.-12:45 p.m. Musicianship development based on the Dalcroze approach. Study of eurhythmics (training the body in rhythm and dynamics), solfege (training the ear, eye and voice in pitch, melody and harmony using fixed- do), improvisation (combining eurhythmics and solfege according to the students’ own invention), and methods (application tools for the classroom and studio). LATIN AMERICANMUSIC Participants will be guided through musical experiences that cover selected musical cultures and genres from throughout Latin America including Puerto Rican plena, Mexican son jarocho, Dominican merengue and Afro- Peruvian music. This hands-on workshop is appropriate for vocal and instrumental educators who teach at the elementary, middle or high school level. MUSIC THEORY PEDAGOGY GMUS 537 (1 credit) Karen Howard, PhD July 5-8 | 1-4:15 p.m.

• Orff Schulwerk concentration • Piano pedagogy concentration ADMISSIONDEADLINES Summer term: April 1 Fall term: July 1 Spring term: Dec. 1 Applications accepted on a rolling basis stthomas.edu/music/graduate/application

CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS ANDOTHER PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT • Kodály certificate program, OAKE-endorsed • Orff Schulwerk certificate program, AOSA-approved • Piano Pedagogy certificate • Teaching World Music certificate • Eurhythmics certificate • Nondegree studies – more than 50 courses and workshops are offered year-round to facilitate lifelong learning opportunities for music education practitioners. TUITION Our tuition rate is $644 per credit. For more information visit: cas.stthomas.edu/admissions/graduate Music courses at the University of St. Thomas are designed for professional music educators who wish to strengthen their classroom teaching effectiveness by combining theoretical and applied study. Internationally recognized educators and musicians – many of whom teach in elementary and secondary schools – serve as faculty for this graduate program. Our work encourages a continual process of music education reform. We initiate programs that address practitioners’ musical, intellectual and professional needs. We value classroom practice, theory and research equally in our quest to improve the quality of music education.

GMUS 544-02 (1 credit) Shersten Johnson, PhD July 5-8 | 1-4:15 p.m.

This study of teaching techniques and current research in the field of music theory pedagogy will prepare students to teach music theory in a variety of educational settings including as part of AP Music Theory courses or as part of other classes or studio lessons.

link.stthomas.edu/musicgraduate

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CHORAL

SMITHSONIAN FOLKWAYS CERTIFICATION INWORLDMUSIC PEDAGOGY

GMUS 536 (3 credits) Karen Howard, PhD June 27-July 1 | 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

INTERMEDIATE CHORAL CONDUCTING GMUS 726 (2 credits) G. Phillip Shoultz, DMA July 11-22 | Noon-3 p.m. Designed for the intermediate choral conductor. Laboratory course with in-depth study of conducting gesture and its effect on choral sound. Individual lessons in the choral lab setting constitute a major component of this course. Score study, rehearsal techniques and performance practice issues.

Students in this intensive course will sample audio, video, print, electronic and human resources with the aim of learning as well as developing an understanding of ways to teach music of the world’s cultures. Attention will be given to learning culture through songs, movement and dance experiences, instrumental music and contextualized cultural components. Participants will be guided through recordings and curricular materials from the Smithsonian Folkways archives that fit the needs of students in knowing music and knowing culture through music. Musical experiences will be tailored for use at various levels, including in classes for children, youth and adults in university and community settings with occasional small group sessions to decipher and discuss applications for particular teaching contexts and aims. Enrolled participants will join together to share particular means of teaching world music and will receive documentation from the Smithsonian Institution that certifies their specialized study in world music pedagogy. TEACHINGGUITAR AND UKULELE GMUS 544-05 (1 credit) Chris Kachian, DMA July 11-15 | 9-11:30 a.m. Preparation for starting or continuing a class guitar and ukulele program. Topics include acquiring and maintaining instruments, reviewing available texts and related materials and age-appropriate pacing of pedagogical materials and approaches. Special focus on teaching musical notations and stylistic genres common to the guitar. Designed for the middle and high school teacher. EXPLORING ASSESSMENT IN

ADVANCED CHORAL CONDUCTING GMUS 727 (2 credits) G. Phillip Shoultz, DMA July 11-22 | 10 a.m.-1 p.m. For the advanced choral conductor. Laboratory course with in-depth study of conducting gesture and its effect on choral sound. Individual lessons in the choral lab setting constitute a major component of this course. Challenging SATB and treble choir pieces and choral/ orchestral repertoire. Score study, rehearsal techniques and performance practice issues. Prerequisite: Intermediate Choral Conducting (GMUS 726) ADVANCED CHORAL CONDUCTING LAB GMUS 728 (1 credit) G. Phillip Shoultz, DMA July 11-22 | 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. During this course, advanced choral conducting students will extend their skills by choosing, analyzing, teaching, rehearsing and conducting a choral octavo in a conducting lab setting. Prerequisite: Advanced Choral Conducting (GMUS 727)

MUSIC EDUCATION GMUS 698 (1 credit)

Douglas C. Orzolek, PhD July 5-8 | 9 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Class participants will learn to develop teaching and assessment skills for a variety of performance tasks: to discover how to improve our students’ understanding of what we want them to do; how well they should do it and how to get it done; explore tools that will help demonstrate to teachers, administrators, parents and students the results of music study; and to discuss various means of assessing and tracking progress.

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CHORAL LITERATURE AND ANALYSIS II GMUS 674 (2 credits) Albert Pinsonneault, DMA June 13-24 (No Class June 20) 9-11:45 a.m. Study of choral literature representing the Classic, Romantic and 20th-century style periods. Survey of historical and style evolution of major choral genres and analysis of representative works for each era. GLOBAL MUSIC TRADITIONS FOR CHOIR Participants will experience singing and choral traditions from a wide variety of musical cultures. Emphasis will be placed on musical characteristics and healthy vocal techniques to achieve particular culturally specific timbres and styles. The music will hail from a variety of countries including (but not limited to) Bulgaria, Macedonia, Tahiti, Ghana and Tanzania. This course is appropriate for singers and choral directors with a particular focus on upper elementary through secondary choral settings. TEACHING CHORAL REPERTOIRE GMUS 652 (2 credits) Karen Howard, PhD June 13-23 (No Class June 20) 1:30-4:45 p.m. Philosophy, methods and materials designed to provide a sound pedagogical and musical basis for building and enhancing a developmental choral program for children ages 7-12. Applicable to a variety of settings (elementary school community, church), the course offers experiences for building skill and knowledge in guiding vocal development (vocal exploration, pitch matching, voice control, tone production), learning strategies for developing a program, acquiring a repertoire bank, organizing a supportive administrative base and creating a sense of community, from the smallest church choir to the largest community choral organization. VOICE FUNDAMENTALS LAB GMUS 544-06 (1 credit) Angela Mitchell and Katelyn Larson July 25- July 29 | 9-11:30 a.m. This elective lab course is designed for vocal music educators who want to improve and apply their understanding of the anatomy, physiology and function of the singing voice in the choral setting and GMUS 518 (2 credits) Georgia Newlin, PhD June 27- July 1 | 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m.

private studio. As an extension of GMUS 676 Voice Fundamentals, this 1-credit elective lab will focus on application. Students will learn how to effectively address vocal challenges in a large group and one-on-one setting. Topics covered include body alignment, respiration, phonation, resonance, adolescent changing voices and vocal health, as well as contemporary commercial music singing technique. Any voice teacher who is seeking to expand their teaching toolbox will benefit from this hands-on, experiential course in vocal pedagogy. DALCROZE The St. Thomas Master of Arts in Music Education curriculum features high quality education in the Dalcroze method, including eurhythmics, solfege, improvisation, and materials and methods. There are two Dalcroze courses offered: a 3-credit introductory course (GMUS 651), and a 1-credit advanced course (GMUS 544). DALCROZEMUSICIANSHIP GMUS 651 (3 credits) Kathy Thomsen, DMA, Dalcroze License June 13-24, 9 a.m.-12:45 p.m. Musicianship development based on the Dalcroze approach. Study of eurhythmics (training the body in rhythm and dynamics), solfege (training the ear, eye and voice in pitch, melody and harmony using fixed- do), improvisation (combining eurhythmics and solfege according to the students’ own invention), and methods (application tools for the classroom and studio). ADVANCEDDALCROZE GMUS 544-01 (1 credit) Kathy Thomsen, DMA, Dalcroze License June 27-July 1, 9 a.m.-12 p.m. A more in-depth study of the Dalcroze approach designed for students who have completed GMUS 651, or have equivalent training. In addition to continued musicianship development, students will prepare and teach several Dalcroze activities and lessons. Prerequisite: Instructor approval.

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INSTRUMENTAL INSTRUMENTAL SCORE STUDY

This course will explore the theoretical perspectives that can help music educators develop a world-inclusive instrumental music program. It will also offer students the opportunity to discover and contemplate original music for bands and orchestras from all over the world. The goal of the course is to help music educators consider how an inclusive approach to instrumental pedagogy can enrich and expand the opportunities provided by performing and rehearsing global music.

AND REPERTOIRE GMUS 687 (3 credits) MatthewGeorge, DMA

June 13-24 (No Class June 20) | 9 a.m.-1:15 p.m. Designed for the experienced conductor interested in deepening skills in practical score analysis. Primary attention to addressing performance problems in the score through rehearsal preparations and physical conducting technique. Literature appropriate to class membership is selected for use in the course. This course is a prerequisite for GMUS 690 Advanced Conducting. AFRICANMUSIC ENSEMBLE GMUS 671 (2 credits) Sowah Mensah June 21-24 | 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Study of traditional African music (Ghanaian culture) through music performance. Performance of chants, songs, music for social and festive occasions, and other vocal and instrumental examples selected from a variety of styles. Classes will focus on learning the music so that students will be able to teach it to their own students. Instrumental music will include drumming, xylophone (gyil or Orff) music and adenkum (gourd stamping tube). All instruments provided except flute and CDs, which can be purchased in class. TEACHINGGUITAR AND UKULELE GMUS 544-05 (1 credit) Chris Kachian, DMA July 11-15 | 9-11:30 a.m. Preparation for starting or continuing a class guitar and ukulele program. Topics include acquiring and maintaining instruments, reviewing available texts and related materials and age-appropriate pacing of pedagogical materials and approaches. Special focus on teaching musical notations and stylistic genres common to the guitar. Designed for the middle and high school teacher. WORLDMUSIC FOR INSTRUMENTAL ENSEMBLES GMUS 544-03 (1 credit) MatthewGeorge, DMA and Douglas C. Orzolek, PhD June 27-July 1 | 9-11:30 a.m. World music is often misrepresented in the instrumental music ensemble due to the lack of resources available to educators as well as the problems connected to the authenticity of the existing repertoire and arrangements.

KODÁLY INSTITUTE

The Kodály Institute at the University of St. Thomas offers a certificate program endorsed by the Organization of American Kodály Educators (OAKE). Coursework provides high quality, intensive studies in musicianship, conducting and ensemble to enable personal growth in musicianship; materials, analysis, classification and retrieval systems to assist students in gathering and systematizing repertoire for their personal teaching situations; and curriculum, pedagogy and instructional techniques to further students’ understanding of and practical experience in designing spiral curricula for literacy-based music education programs using inquiry- based teaching techniques. KODALY LEVELS I-III Faculty: Casey Barker, Nyssa Brown, Leigh Ann Garner, EdD and Dan LeJeune KODALY LEVEL I GMUS 741 (3 credits) July 11-22 | 8 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Kodály Level I study in musicianship and choral ensemble; materials, analysis, classification and retrieval systems; and curriculum, pedagogy and instructional techniques. Emphasis is placed on teaching grades K and 1.

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KODALY LEVEL II GMUS 742 (3 credits) July 11-22 | 8 a.m.-4:45 p.m.

ORFF SCHULWERK LEVEL II GMUS 732 (3 credits) July 25 | 8 a.m.-4:45 p.m.

July 26-August 5 | 8:30 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Study of pentatonic, diatonic and modal melodies; melodic ostinato, bordun and shifting chord accompaniments; irregular and changing meters; alto recorder and classroom applications and improvisation; and sequential teaching of dance forms and folk dances. Prerequisite: GMUS 731 or equivalent AOSA approved course. ORFF SCHULWERK LEVEL III GMUS 732 (3 credits) July 25 | 8 a.m.-4:45 p.m. July 26-August 5 | 8:30 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Improvisation in diatonic modes, asymmetric meters and harmonic accompaniments; ensemble performance of all recorder voices; choreography and improvisation relative to movement and music. Prerequisite: GMUS 732 or equivalent AOSA approved course.

Kodály Level II study inmusicianship and choral ensemble; materials, analysis, classification and retrieval systems; and curriculum, pedagogy and instructional techniques. Emphasis is placed on teaching grades 2 and 3. Prerequisite: Kodály Level I or equivalent. KODALY LEVEL III GMUS 743 (3 credits) July 11-22 | 8 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Kodály Level III study in musicianship and choral ensemble; materials, analysis, classification and retrieval systems; and curriculum, pedagogy and instructional techniques. Emphasis is placed on teaching grades 4 and 5. Prerequisite: Kodály Level II or equivalent. ORFF SCHULWERK The Orff Schulwerk program is a model of innovation for Orff Schulwerk certification courses offered in the United States. The University of St. Thomas curriculum features education in subjects required by the American Orff Schulwerk Association: technique and improvisation, analysis and arranging, pedagogy, movement and recorder – all of which are highlighted in individual classes and integrated through literature study. A distinctive feature of the St. Thomas program is the opportunity for students to engage in practical application of ensemble work in a daily pedagogy hour at each level of study. ORFF SCHULWERK LEVELS I-III Faculty: Jay Broeker, Andrew Ellingsen, Mona Mann, andMegan Tietz GMUS 731, 732, 733 and 735 are required for MA Orff concentration and Orff mastery certificate students. ORFF SCHULWERK LEVEL I GMUS 731 (3 credits) July 25 | 8 a.m.-4:45 p.m. July 26-August 5 | 8:30 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Basic Orff elemental musicianship, including study of pentatonic melodies, ostinati, bordun accompaniments and elemental forms; soprano recorder technique; classroom application, technique and improvisation; and basic movement skills, classroom application and folkdance.

ORFF CURRICULUMDEVELOPMENT GMUS 735 (2 credits) Diana Hawley August 8-12 | 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Classroom application of basic Orff vocabulary, theory, sequential skills and concepts for the classroom. Implementation of typical Orff activities in learning experiences designed for elementary students. In-depth objectives for each grade; development of supporting teaching strategies and lesson plans; skills and concepts curriculum grid. Emphasis on application of studies through small-group and peer teaching. Prerequisite: Orff Levels I and II from any AOSA approved course.

link.stthomas.edu/musicgraduate

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PIANO PEDAGOGY SUPERVISED TEACHING GMUS 800 (2 credits)

AFRICANMUSIC ENSEMBLE GMUS 671 (2 credits) Sowah Mensah June 21-24 | 9 a.m.-2 p.m.

Faculty direction and observation of each student’s teaching. Students will videotape their own piano students for the basis of the class. Prerequisite: Completion of pedagogy courses. INTERMEDIATE PIANO REPERTOIRE

Study of traditional African music (Ghanaian culture) through music performance. Performance of chants, songs, music for social and festive occasions, and other vocal and instrumental examples selected from a variety of styles. Classes will focus on learning the music so that students will be able to teach it to their own students. Instrumental music will include drumming, xylophone (gyil or Orff) music and adenkum (gourd stamping tube). All instruments provided except flute and CDs, which can be purchased in class.

GMUS 544-07 (1 credit) Suzanne Schons, PhD June 27-July 1 | Online

Participants in this course will survey a wide variety of intermediate solo piano repertoire by both traditional and underrepresented composers. Students will analyze pieces to determine pedagogical challenges and develop skill in leveling and sequencing repertoire. Evaluating editions and anthologies will also be included. This course partially fulfills the course requirement for Intermediate Methods and Materials (GMUS 772) for the graduate degree or certificate in piano pedagogy and serves as an elective credit for other music education concentrations. Prerequisite: Class participants should be able to sightread piano music at the early-intermediate level to be successful in this course. WORLDMUSIC SMITHSONIAN FOLKWAYS CERTIFICATION INWORLDMUSIC PEDAGOGY Students in this intensive course will sample audio, video, print, electronic and human resources with the aim of learning as well as developing an understanding of ways to teach music of the world’s cultures. Attention will be given to learning culture through songs, movement and dance experiences, instrumental music and contextualized cultural components. Participants will be guided through recordings and curricular materials from the Smithsonian Folkways archives that fit the needs of students in knowing music and knowing culture through music. Musical experiences will be tailored for use at various levels, including in classes for children, youth and adults in university and community settings with occasional small group sessions to decipher and discuss applications for particular teaching contexts and aims. Enrolled participants will join together to share particular means of teaching world music and will receive documentation from the Smithsonian Institution that certifies their specialized study in world music pedagogy. GMUS 536 (3 credits) Karen Howard, PhD June 27-July 1 | 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

GLOBAL MUSIC TRADITIONS FOR CHOIR GMUS 652 (2 credits) Karen Howard, PhD June 13-23 (No Class June 20) | 1:30-4:45 p.m. Participants will experience singing and choral traditions from a wide variety of musical cultures. Emphasis will be placed on musical characteristics and healthy vocal techniques to achieve particular culturally specific timbres and styles. The music will hail from a variety of countries including (but not limited to) Bulgaria, Macedonia, Tahiti, Ghana and Tanzania. This course is appropriate for singers and choral directors with a particular focus on upper elementary through secondary choral settings. LATIN AMERICANMUSIC

GMUS 537 (1 credit) Karen Howard, PhD July 5-8 | 1-4:15 p.m.

Participants will be guided through musical experiences that cover selected musical cultures and genres from throughout Latin America including Puerto Rican plena, Mexican son jarocho, Dominican merengue and Afro-

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of music to children in grades K-12. Applications of principles and concepts inherent in these theories to the teaching and learning of music. FOUNDATIONS OFMUSIC EDUCATION

Peruvian music. This hands-on workshop is appropriate for vocal and instrumental educators who teach at the elementary, middle or high school level. WORLDMUSIC FOR INSTRUMENTAL ENSEMBLES GMUS 544-03 (1 credit) MatthewGeorge, DMA and Douglas C. Orzolek, PhD June 27-July 1 | 9 a.m-11:30 a.m. World music is often misrepresented in the instrumental music ensemble due to the lack of resources available to educators as well as the problems connected to the authenticity of the existing repertoire and arrangements. This course will explore the theoretical perspectives that can help music educators develop a world-inclusive instrumental music program. It will also offer students the opportunity to discover and contemplate original music for bands and orchestras from all over the world. The goal of the course is to help music educators consider how an inclusive approach to instrumental pedagogy can enrich and expand the opportunities provided by performing and rehearsing global music. MASTER OF ARTS CORE COURSES INTRODUCTION TO SCHOLARSHIP AND RESEARCHMETHODS INMUSIC EDUCATION GMUS 600 (3 credits) Karen Howard, PhD June 13-July 22 | Online This course will guide students toward: comprehending research articles and methodologies that they will encounter over the course of their careers; building skills in working with library resources, database and other bibliographic materials; developing skills generally in academic writing and American written English - and particularly in accordance with the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th Edition; and provide an opportunity for initial thinking about how they will carry out their work for GMUS 890 in terms of a topic and format. TEACHING AND LEARNING GMUS 601 (3 credits) Douglas C. Orzolek, PhD June 21-July 28 | 6-9:30 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday Comprehensive overview of learning theories, instructional theories and implications for the teaching

GMUS 608 (3 credits) Bruce Gleason, PhD June 22-July 27 | 6-9:30 p.m. Monday andWednesday

Consideration of cultural, philosophical and historical contexts of music education through reading assignments and student presentations. PERSPECTIVES INMUSIC THEORY GMUS 611 (3 credits) Shersten Johnson, PhD June 22-July 27 | 6-9:30 p.m. Monday andWednesday Creative construction of conceptual frameworks that blend traditional analytical techniques with recent trends in music theory scholarship. Development of methodology for the perceptual and reflective study of musical processes, style and meaning. Critical listening, score reading, composing and writing about music.

TOPICS INMUSIC HISTORY, LITERATURE AND THEORY GMUS 612 (3 credits) June 21-July 28 | 6-9:30 p.m. | Tuesday and Thursday This course explores the history and ideas surrounding American song, from works performed by voice as well as instrumental versions of songs. Topics covered will include 19th c. song, Sousa and his influence, Irving Berlin, Blues, Jazz, Chuck Berry and Rock, Musical Theater, Country Music, Women’s Voices in Music and Ragtime.

link.stthomas.edu/musicgraduate

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MA FINAL PROJECT GMUS 890 (1 credit) Graduate Music Education Faculty

Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Master of Arts in Music Education, Music History and Theory Diagnostic exam. MUSICIANSHIP GMUS 750 (1 credit) Kathy Thomsen, DMA July 5-8 | 9 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Studies in musicianship, including systematic sight- reading, aural transcription and analytical skill development. Course is required for all Master of Arts students (not required of Kodály concentration). PSYCHOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF ARTS EDUCATION GMUS 842 (3 credits) Douglas C. Orzolek, PhD June 22-July 27 | 6-9:30 p.m. | Monday and Wednesday, Online Application of philosophical theory to practical issues and problems facing the field of arts education. One of the primary goals of the course is the development of a personal philosophy of arts education. Topics include art and feeling, the creative process, aesthetic meaning, aesthetic experience, musical meaning and experiences in arts education. Please note that the primary artistic area explored will be music. DIRECTED RESEARCH GMUS 876 (0 credits) Graduate Music Education Faculty The only occasions students register for GMUS 876 are when: 1. T hey have selected Designs Four or Five and are in the first semester of the process (see individual Design Four or Design Five Guidelines), or 2. W hen they are in a “hold” mode of not working with their advisors for a term and thus are registered for GMUS 876-99. a. Students will not be assessed the one-credit tuition fee for a semester in which they are not working with their advisor but instead will register for GMUS 876-99 ($75 fee assessed) during these terms. b. G MUS 876-99 terms are limited to one per student. c. For students completing Designs Four or Five, GMUS 876 and GMUS 890 cannot be interspersed with a section 99 without approval from the advisor and director of GPME. Students enroll in the section of GMUS 876 matching the project advisor’s name. If not working with an advisor, register for section 99.

Students enroll in the section of GMUS 890 (and 876 in the cases of Designs Four and Five) matching the project advisor’s name during the semester they write and complete their projects.

APPLIED PERFORMANCE

APPLIED PERFORMANCE STUDIES GMUS 570-593 (1 credit)

Twelve 50-minute individual lessons: 1 credit; twelve 30-minute individual lessons: 1 credit. Arrange private lessons with the instructor BEFORE registering. Specify the instructor and duration of lessons on the course registration form or send an email to gradmusic@stthomas.edu.

GMUS 570 Harpsichord GMUS 571 Piano GMUS 572 Lute GMUS 573 Recorder GMUS 574 Voice GMUS 575 Organ GMUS 576 Flute GMUS 577 Oboe GMUS 578 Clarinet GMUS 579 Bassoon GMUS 580 Saxophone GMUS 581 Trumpet

GMUS 582 French Horn GMUS 583 Trombone GMUS 584 Euphonium GMUS 585 Tuba GMUS 586 Percussion GMUS 587 Violin GMUS 588 Viola GMUS 589 Cello GMUS 590 Double Bass GMUS 591 Guitar GMUS 592 Harp GMUS 593 Composition

HOWTO REGISTER FOR COURSES Active students: All students with an active St. Thomas identification number register for courses through Murphy Online. New to the University of St. Thomas or inactive identification number: Complete the registration form on the back inside cover and send it in as directed on the upper-right corner. You can also

access the registration form online: link.stthomas.edu/musicgraduate.

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WEEK-BY-WEEK SCHEDULE

JUNE 13-17 • Instrumental Score Study and Repertoire • Choral Literature and Analysis II • Dalcroze Musicianship • Global Music Traditions for Choir • Introduction to Scholarship and Research Methods in Music Education JUNE 20-24 (NOCLASS JUNE 20) • African Music Ensemble • Instrumental Score Study and Repertoire (cont.) • Choral Literature and Analysis II (cont.) • Dalcroze Musicianship (cont.) • Global Music Traditions for Choir (cont.) • Introduction to Scholarship and Research Methods in Music Education (cont.) • Teaching and Learning • Foundations of Music Education • Perspectives in Music Theory • Topics in Music History, Literature and Theory • Psychological Foundations of Arts Education JUNE 27-JULY 1 • Smithsonian Folkways Certification in World Music Pedagogy • World Music for Instrumental Ensembles • Teaching Choral Repertoire • Advanced Dalcroze • Introduction to Scholarship and Research Methods in Music Education (cont.) • Teaching and Learning (cont.)

JULY 11-15 • Intermediate Choral Conducting • Advanced Choral Conducting • Advanced Choral Conducting Lab • Kodaly Levels I-II-III • Teaching Guitar and Ukulele • Introduction to Scholarship and Research Methods in Music Education (cont.) • Teaching and Learning (cont.)

• Foundations of Music Education (cont.) • Perspectives in Music Theory (cont.)

• Topics in Music History, Literature and Theory (cont.) • Psychological Foundations of Arts Education (cont.) JULY 18-22 • Intermediate Choral Conducting (cont.) • Advanced Choral Conducting (cont.) • Advanced Choral Conducting Lab (cont.) • Kodaly Levels I-II-III (cont.) • Introduction to Scholarship and Research Methods in Music Education (cont.) • Teaching and Learning (cont.)

• Foundations of Music Education (cont.) • Perspectives in Music Theory (cont.)

• Topics in Music History, Literature and Theory (cont.) • Psychological Foundations of Arts Education (cont.) JULY 25-29 • Orff Schulwerk Levels I-II-III • Voice Fundamentals Lab • Teaching and Learning (cont.)

• Foundations of Music Education (cont.) • Perspectives in Music Theory (cont.)

• Foundations of Music Education (cont.) • Perspectives in Music Theory (cont.)

• Topics in Music History, Literature and Theory (cont.) • Psychological Foundations of Arts Education (cont.) • Intermediate Piano Repertoire JULY 4-8 (NOCLASS JULY 4) • Latin American Music • Musicianship • Exploring Assessment • Music Theory Pedagogy • Introduction to Scholarship and Research Methods in Music Education (cont.) • Teaching and Learning (cont.)

• Topics in Music History, Literature and Theory (cont.) • Psychological Foundations of Arts Education (cont.) AUG. 1-5 • Orff Schulwerk Levels I-II-III (cont.) AUG. 8-12 • Orff Curriculum Development

• Foundations of Music Education (cont.) • Perspectives in Music Theory (cont.)

• Topics in Music History, Literature and Theory (cont.) • Psychological Foundations of Arts Education (cont.)

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$644 PER CREDIT for degree and nondegree students

Please complete, detach and send/fax to:

University of St. Thomas BEC 107 2115 Summit Ave. St. Paul, MN 55105-1096 Phone: (651) 962-5870 Fax: (651) 962-5886 Email: music@stthomas.edu

COURSE REGISTRATION

STUDENT INFORMATION

Name

Last/Family/Surname

First/Given Name

Middle Name

Jr., etc.

Title

Birth Date

Gender

Mr.

Mrs.

Miss

Ms.

Dr.

/

/

mm/dd/yy

Address

Number and Street

Apartment #

City/Town

State/Province

ZIP/Postal Code

St. Thomas ID #

OR Social Security #

Registration Term

Phone

Spring 20 Summer 20 Fall 20

Daytime

Evening

Cell

Email

Institution

Major

COURSE REGISTRATION

Course # and Section #

Course Title

# of Credits Degree Nondegree Audit (Workshop/ no credit)

** All Performance Studies registrations MUST include instructor AND length of study (30 minutes or 50 minutes) or registration will not be processed. CITIZENSHIP The University of St. Thomas is required to report student profile information to the state and federal government. Your responses are confidential and will not influence admission to the university. Country of Citizenship United States Citizen Permanent Resident of the United States Foreign Students Visa Type Visa # Ethnicity U.S. Military Veteran No Yes (If Yes) Status Students with Disabilities The University of St. Thomas provides support services for all students with disabilities. If you have a learning disability/ADHD/ ADD or physical or psychological disabilities, contact the Enhancement Program at (651) 962-6315 or visit stthomas.edu/enhancementprog. White Asian Black or African American Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander American Indian/Alaskan Native Two or More Races Declined Race/Ethnicity Unknown Hispanic or Latino

I have read and understand the terms of registration and I understand the information in this document may be subject to change.

Signature

Date

/

/

mm/dd/yy

NONPROFIT ORG. U.S.POSTAGE PAID UNIVERSITY OF ST. THOMAS

Graduate Programs in Music Education BEC 107 2115 Summit Ave. St. Paul, MN 55105-1096 USA

NO APPLICATION FEE. Degree, nondegree and audit/workshop options available.

The University of St. Thomas is an equal opportunity educator and employer. St. Thomas does not unlawfully discriminate, in any of its programsoractivities, onthebasisof race, color, creed, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, family status, disability, age, marital status, status with regard to public assistance, membership or activity in a local commission, genetic information or any other characteristic protected by applicable law. stthomas.edu/eostatement

All programs offered by the University of St. Thomas shall be readily accessible to individuals with disabilities. For details, call (651) 962-6315.

22000227 CASM

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