School of Engineering New Student Guide

NEW STUDENT GUIDE

undergraduate engineering

WELC An uncommon engineering experience, all for the common good. It takes more than theory to transform an idea into useful technology for our society. St. Thomas engineers emerge with practical, hands-on experience, the power of strong communication skills and the broad perspective of a liberal arts education. Our programs are

100% of engineers graduate with the foundational liberal arts core curriculum common to all majors at St. Thomas.

designed to transform the young creative minds of our students into engineers who can truly make a difference in the world. This guide is designed to answer many of your questions, but you should know the best way to learn is to simply ask us a question. That is why we are here. Dr. Don Weinkauf Dean, School of Engineering

At the University of St. Thomas, we develop students to be morally responsible leaders, preparing them for active work toward a more just and civil society.

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COME 45% of engineering students study abroad while at St. Thomas. 50% of our students work on research projects with a faculty member outside their coursework. 80% of our senior engineering students graduate with a technical internship or co-op experience in industry. Many with more than one!

100% of engineering students design and solve an engineering problem for industry as a part of our Senior Design Clinic.

1 in 9 St. Thomas students major in engineering.

New Student Guide 3

? REQUENTLY asked QUESTIONS WHEN SHOULD I MEET WITH MY ADVISER? St. Thomas has many wonderful opportunities for our engineering students that your adviser can point out to you, so we suggest you meet with your adviser right away. He or she will be happy to talk with you about your course selections, goals, career path options and other possibilities during your time here. WHAT LANGUAGE SHOULD I TAKE? St. Thomas requires all students to learn a language. St. Thomas has several languages to choose from; there isn’t a bad choice in the bunch. Based on your career path and study abroad options, you may want, for example, to take Italian before going abroad for the J-Term Engineering in Rome course. Other languages that are popular for engineers are Spanish, German, French and Arabic. Feel free to ask your adviser for more information on the best choice for your plan of study. If you have taken a language in high school or speak a second language in your home, you may be able to test out of all or part of this requirement. We suggest taking this placement exam as soon as possible, either in your first semester or even over the summer before you start in the fall. WHAT KIND OF COMPUTER SHOULD I BUY? It is suggested that each student own a laptop or tablet style computer. We do not suggest any specific brand, but we do strongly suggest a Windows OS/PC over a Macintosh/Apple (some of the most used engineering applications will only work with a Windows operating system). Recommended build: Quad Core 1.8GHz i7 processor (Dual Core 2.7GHz i5 at minimum), 16GB RAM, 500GB SSD (256GB HDD at minimum) and a discrete graphics card (256MB integrated or Intel HD video graphics at a minimum). A multiyear warranty with accidental damage protection is recommended. Questions – contact us at engineering@stthomas.edu or go to link.stthomas.edu/ engcomputerhelp for more information. WHAT SHOULD TRANSFER STUDENTS KNOW? The School of Engineering welcomes transfer students. To make the transition process as easy as possible, we are happy to help you select classes at your current institution so you know what will transfer to the University of St. Thomas. We also have many resources for financial aid, transcript review and information for veterans. We are happy to help you with any questions you may have about coming to St. Thomas. Questions? Contact Dr. Jenny Holte, an engineering professor and our engineering transfer coordinator, at jholte@stthomas.edu or (651) 962-5763.

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St. Thomas is one of a few universities that has a microgrid. This is a great place to do research. “The next 10-30 years are the most pivotal in human history. We need the best and the brightest to become engineers to figure this out. ” Dr. Mahmoud Kabalan, director of the St. Thomas Microgrid.

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W hat can you do with an

ENGINEERING EDUCATION? The better question is: What can’t you do? Our graduates work in a vast array of industries, from biomedical to aerospace, from design to manufacturing and from semiconductors to power companies. Additionally, our engineers find graduate school options at the best institutions in the country. Others take paths in medicine, law and business.

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meet KAO SOUA YANG civil engineering major

Hometown: Thailand. My family moved to Minnesota when I was 7.

Major: Civil engineering

Best thing about civil engineering: It’s new. It’s exciting to be the first ones in the program. I also like building things. You work at MnDOT. What do you do there? I started working there in the spring of my senior year in high school. I have worked in the design office, the traffic forecasting office and now I am back in the design office.

Describe yourself in three words: Hardworking, patient and loyal

Where to find you on a Sunday afternoon: At work; I also work at U.S. Bank.

Something most people wouldn’t know about you: I’m funny.

Why engineering? I was put into an engineering and STEM program in high school. I liked math and I liked science, but I didn’t want to do either full time and found that engineering was a good middle. Why St. Thomas? I started at Macalester but really wanted to do engineering, and I wanted to stay in the Twin Cities. I thought the University of Minnesota was too big.

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CIVIL ENGINEERING Plan of Study **

FALL

SPRING

FYEX : Foundation for College Success

ENGR 100 : (FYE) Introduction to Engineering Design

ENGR 160 : Surveying

GEOL 163 : Applied Geology (Lab)

MATH 113 : Calculus I

MATH 114 : Calculus II

CISC 130: Introduction to Programming and Problem Solving in the Sciences

PHYS 211 : Classical Physics I

CORE: Requirement

CORE: Requirement

J-TERM*

SUMMER

CORE: Requirement

ENGR 220 : Statics

ENGR 221 : Mechanics of Materials (Lab)

MATH 210 : Introduction to Differential Equations and Systems

ENGR 222 : Dynamics for Civil Engineering

CHEM 109 : General Chemistry for Engineers (Lab)

STAT 220 : Statistics I (Lab)

CORE: Requirement

CORE: Requirement

J-TERM*

SUMMER

CORE: Requirement

ENGR 362 : Construction and Engineering Economic Analysis (Lab)

ENGR 363 : Construction Materials

ENGR 364 : Structural Analysis

ENGR365: Design of Steel and Concrete Structures (Lab)

ENGR 368 : Fluids Mechanics for Civil Engineering (Lab)

PHYS 212: Classical Physics II

CORE: Requirement

CORE: Requirement

J-TERM*

SUMMER

CORE: Requirement

ENGR 480 : Engineering Design Clinic I

ENGR 481 : Engineering Design Clinic II

ENGR 463 : Soil Mechanics and Foundations (Lab)

ENGR 468 : Environmental Engineering

ENGR 467 : Water Resources

ENGR 466 : Transportation Engineering

CORE: Requirement

CORE: Requirement

J-TERM*

SUMMER

*

January Term

** This is one snapshot of how the plan of study for this major can look. Plans of study for Math 108/109 sequence, semester and/or J-Term abroad, and for ROTC students are available. Please meet with your adviser to personalize your plan. Arrow indicates that the two courses can be interchanged.

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meet ANNIE THOMPSON computer engineering, 2019 Hometown: St. Paul, Minnesota

Degree: Computer engineering

Describe yourself in three words: Curious, passionate and hardworking

Where to find you on a Sunday afternoon: I’m a Vikings fan so I watch football, but during the off-season I’m usually outside somewhere hiking or fishing. Why engineering: I was an English major as a freshman. I looked at the Engineering New Student Guide and I liked the classes for this major. My grandpa was an engineer and was a pilot in World War II. I also like the show “The X-Files” in which Dana Scully is written as a positive role model for women and I like solving problems. Best thingabout your computer engineeringmajor: I loved the diversity of what I studied. I also loved the small class sizes and the access to the professors. To me, computer engineering is the best as I get to do both software and electrical engineering. What are you doing now: I’m currently at 3M in the Data Science and Analytics lab working as a software developer.

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COMPUTER ENGINEERING Plan of Study **

FALL

SPRING

FYEX : Foundation for College Success

ENGR 100 : (FYE) Introduction to Engineering Design

ENGR 175 : Introduction to Electrical & Computer Engineering

PHYS 211 : Classical Physics I

MATH 113 : Calculus I

MATH 114 : Calculus II

CISC 130: Introduction to Programming and Problem Solving in the Sciences

ENGR 230 : Digital Design (lab)

CORE: Requirement

CORE: Requirement

J-TERM*

SUMMER

CORE: Requirement

ENGR 240 : Circuit Analysis (Lab)

CISC 230 : Object-Oriented Design and Programming

ENGR 330 : Microprocessor Architectures

ENGR 331 : Designing with Microprocessors (Lab)

PHYS 212 : Classical Physics II

MATH 210 : Introduction toDifferential Equations and Systems

CORE: Requirement

CORE: Requirement

J-TERM*

SUMMER

CORE: Requirement

ENGR 345 : Electronics I (Lab)

ENGR 432 : Current Trends in Computing Systems

ENGR 431 : Design of Embedded Systems (Lab)

CISC231: Data Structures using Object-Oriented Design (Lab)

MATH 128 : Introduction to Discrete Mathematics

ENGR/CISC XXX: Elective 1

CORE: Requirement

CORE: Requirement

J-TERM*

SUMMER

ENGR 480 : Engineering Design Clinic I

ENGR 481 : Engineering Design Clinic II

MATH/SCI XXX : Elective 1

MATH/SCI XXX : Elective 2

ENGR/CISC XXX : Elective 2

CORE: Requirement

CORE: Requirement

CORE: Requirement

J-TERM*

SUMMER

*

January Term

** This is one snapshot of how the plan of study for this major can look. Plans of study for Math 108/109 sequence, semester and/or J-Term abroad, and for ROTC students are available. Please meet with your adviser to personalize your plan. Arrow indicates that the two courses can be interchanged.

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meet ANDREWROHKOHL electrical engineering major

Hometown: Edina, Minnesota

Major: Electrical engineering

What is it like playing a Division III sport and majoring in engineering? Hockey gave me an outlet for my competitiveness. Playing a sport at St. Thomas is a great way to make a large group of friends easily and my teammates gave me built-in support. You also learn time management skills. You do have to make some sacrifices, but in the end it is more rewarding than not doing it. Why St. Thomas? My older sister went here, as well as almost all my mother’s family, and it felt natural to follow in their footsteps. But I chose it for the small class sizes and the interaction with the faculty.

Describe yourself in three words: Genuine, compassionate and hardworking

Best thing about your electrical engineering major: I feel like I can make an impact. In the medical device industry I feel I can have this purpose. I also really enjoy programming and electronic design. Favorite St. Thomas class: Engineering 331 – Embedded Systems. This was my first class that was hands-on. A chance to use programming to actually solve problems. Next event you are excited to go to: I’m excited to finish my Senior Design Project. After that I have accepted a position at 3M.

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ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING Plan of Study **

FALL

SPRING

FYEX : Foundation for College Success

ENGR 100 : (FYE) Introduction to Engineering Design

ENGR 175 : Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering

PHYS 211 : Classical Physics I

MATH 113 : Calculus I

MATH 114 : Calculus II

CORE: Requirement

CISC 130 : Introduction to Programming and Problem Solving in the Sciences

CORE: Requirement

CORE: Requirement

J-TERM*

SUMMER

CORE: Requirement

ENGR 230 : Digital Design (Lab)

ENGR 240 : Circuit Analysis (Lab)

MATH 200 : Multi-Variable Calculus

MATH 210 : Introduction toDifferential Equations and Systems

PHYS 212 : Classical Physics II

PHYS 225 : Application of Modern Physics (Lab)

CORE: Requirement

CORE: Requirement

J-TERM*

SUMMER

CORE: Requirement

ENGR 340 : Signals & Systems

ENGR 410 : Control Systems and Automation (Lab)

ENGR 345 : Electronics I (Lab)

ENGR 346 : Electronics II

ENGR 331 : Applications of Microprocessors (Lab)

ENGR XXX: Engineering Elective 1

CORE: Requirement

CORE: Requirement

J-TERM*

SUMMER

ENGR 480 : Engineering Design Clinic I

ENGR 481 : Engineering Design Clinic II

PHYS 341 : Electricity and Magnetism

ENGR 342 : Electromagnetic Fields & Waves

ENGR XXX : Engineering Elective 2

ENGR XXX : Engineering Elective 3

CORE: Requirement

CORE: Requirement

J-TERM*

SUMMER

*

January Term

** This is one snapshot of how the plan of study for this major can look. Plans of study for Math 108/109 sequence, semester and/or J-Term abroad, and for ROTC students are available. Please meet with your adviser to personalize your plan. Arrow indicates that the two courses can be interchanged.

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meet TJ LEE mechanical engineering major

Hometown: River Falls, Wisconsin

Major: Mechanical engineering

Minors: Materials science and chemistry

Describe yourself in three words: Curious, hardworking and practical

Best thing about the engineering program: The professors. They care about the work you are doing and they care about you – they want you to have opportunities. Also St. Thomas is strong technically and a lot of hands-on. Where you’ll find me on a Sunday afternoon: Doing homework, spending time with my wife and watching a movie.

Something people wouldn’t know about me: My hobby is woodworking.

Favorite St. Thomas class: Well, I can’t pick – both Materials Engineering and then Manufacturing – because it is how we do things and both had excellent professors. Why St. Thomas? I started at Century College and transferred to St. Thomas after my grandfather suggested I look at the program. I appreciated the small class sizes and the transfer scholarship.

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MECHANICAL ENGINEERING Plan of Study **

FALL

SPRING

FYEX : Foundation for College Success

ENGR 100 : (FYE) Introduction to Engineering Design

CISC 130 : Introduction to Programming and Problem Solving in the Sciences

ENGR 170 : Mechanical Engineering Graphics

PHYS 211 : Classical Physics I

MATH 113 : Calculus I

MATH 114 : Calculus II

CORE: Requirement

CORE: Requirement

CORE: Requirement

J-TERM*

SUMMER

CORE: Requirement

ENGR 220 : Statics

ENGR 221 : Mechanics of Materials (Lab)

MATH 200 : Multi-Variable Calculus

MATH 210 : Introduction toDifferential Equations and Systems

PHYS 212 : Classical Physics II

CHEM109 : General Chemistry for Engineers (Lab)

CORE: Requirement

CORE: Requirement

J-TERM*

SUMMER

CORE: Requirement

ENGR 255 : Fabrication Skills (Lab)

ENGR 322 : Dynamics (Lab)

ENGR 350 : Introduction to Electronics (Lab)

ENGR 371 : Manufacturing Processes and Statistical Control

ENGR 320: Machine Design and Synthesis (Lab)

ENGR 381 : Thermodynamics (Lab)

ENGR 383: Fluid Mechanics (Lab)

CORE: Requirement

CORE: Requirement

J-TERM*

SUMMER

ENGR 480 : Engineering Design Clinic I

ENGR 481 : Engineering Design Clinic II

ENGR 410 : Control Systems and Automation (Lab)

ENGR 384 : Heat Transfer (Lab)

ENGR 361 : Engineering Materials (Lab)

ENGR XXX : Engineering Elective

CORE: Requirement

CORE: Requirement

J-TERM*

SUMMER

*

January Term

** This is one snapshot of how the plan of study for this major can look. Plans of study for Math 108/109 sequence, semester and/or J-Term abroad, and for ROTC students are available. Please meet with your adviser to personalize your plan. Arrow indicates that the two courses can be interchanged.

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M ANY WAYS to

STUDY ABROAD Engineering is a global profession, so global experience matters. And very soon we hope students can safely study abroad again. The School of Engineering provides several opportunities for you to study abroad as an engineering student while still allowing you to graduate on time. In addition, financial aid usually carries over to these study abroad programs, making themmore affordable than you might think. SEMESTER ABROAD St. Thomas offers semester abroad programs in more than 50 countries around the globe, and the Office of Study Abroad will work with you to find the best fit for your four-year plan. In addition, the School of Engineering has developed opportunities in Australia and South Korea that incorporate transferable coursework for many engineering majors. GERMAN AND ENGINEERING DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM Our five-year international program includes a full year abroad. You’ll study at a partner university in Germany for one semester followed by a semester-long paid internship in Germany. In this university-industry collaboration you earn two degrees – one in German and one in engineering – plus you graduate with globally-focused industry experience.

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SENIOR DESIGN As an Ashoka U Changemaker Campus, St. Thomas offers many ways to contribute to social innovation and sustainability. The School of Engineering now offers summer programs in the countries of Jordan or Peru where you and a team of students can engage in social entrepreneurship in collaboration with local communities to complete your Senior Design Clinic. J-TERMOR SUMMER SESSION St. Thomas provides faculty-led study abroad options during J-Term and summer session. These shorter, focused courses provide experience in a different culture to learn more about global problems and solutions. Engineering in Rome is a regular option.

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With St. Thomas’ unique peace engineering minor you can collaborate with those experiencing injustices throughout the world to develop innovative and sustainable solutions that can empower communities worldwide. The integrative program brings the social analysis of justice and peace studies together with the technical skills of engineering to find the best way for our engineers to promote the common good. You might work on projects such as: • Energy and water resources • Aid of technology in areas of conflict or natural disaster • Public safety in engineering decisions • Agricultural tools to fight poverty and hunger eace Engineering

DESIGN OF AMANUALLY OPERATED FOOD

SHREDDER FOR THE DEVELOPINGWORLD A group of engineering seniors designed a shredder that enables plentiful breadfruit to be made into flour.

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ast Track Master’s and other graduate degree options

ENGINEERING AND SOFTWARE MASTER’S DEGREE OPTIONS AT ST. THOMAS It may seem too early to look into graduate programs when you are just starting your undergraduate career. That said, we believe you will be surprised at how fast the years here will fly by. Tommie engineers go on to study for advanced degrees all over the world. However, right here, the St. Thomas School of Engineering offers many master’s degrees as well as a variety of graduate certificates designed to meet the diverse needs of industry and working professionals. As a Tommie, your application fee for our master’s programs is waived. Talk to your adviser about the option of a five-year master’s track. We host regular graduate program information sessions that are listed on our website (stthomas.edu/engineering). Talk to your adviser about the option of a five-year master’s track, earning both a BS and a MS in five years (saving time and money)! Electrical Engineering Manufacturing Engineering Mechanical Engineering

Data Science Information Technology Regulatory Science Software Management Technology Management

Software Engineering Systems Engineering

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pportunities

STUDENT CLUBS Joining a student club is a great way to learn about engineering, meet people from industry, travel and have fun! • American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) • American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) • Computer Science Club • Engineers for a Sustainable World (ESW) • Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) • National Society of Black Engineers • Projects and Robotics Club • Society of American Military Engineers (SAME) • Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE) • Society of Women Engineers (SWE)

GAIN INDUSTRY EXPERIENCE Nearly 80% of our graduates have an internship or co-op industry experience. Our outstanding relationships with companies in the Twin Cities create abundant opportunities for you to gain real-world experience. There are also options for internships in other countries! These four information resources will help you find the best internship or co-op for you: • Your engineering adviser • Dr. Genevieve Gagnon, engineering co-op program coordinator (gagn5892@stthomas.edu), or Dr. Camille George, internships abroad adviser (cmgeorge@stthomas.edu) • The Career Services job website, which lists internships and full-time job opportunities stthomas.edu/careerdevelopment • Attending presentations to gain important insights when companies visit campus

Every fall, the tables are turned on a normal career fair. Upper-level engineering students prepare a poster board to present themselves to prospective employers. St. Thomas engineering students interested in full-time employment and internships represent themselves with a poster board and stand by as prospective employers, many of whom are engineering alumni, walk and talk with students about their particular interests and talents. Student resumes are posted online for employers to preview. See a video of Meet the Engineers: stthomas.edu/engineering/mte. To learn more, talk to your adviser and contact Jacki Kubal, jkkubal@stthomas.edu. Find more information on engineering clubs at stthomas.edu/engineering/undergraduate/studentclubs. eet the Engineers Career Fair

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aculty-Student Research More than half of engineering students conduct research with professors – and their work can be groundbreaking. Recently, three mechanical engineering students and their professor created a magnetic device that can capture energy from a beating heart to power a device such as a pacemaker.

Our work has the potential to impact the lives of those across the globe. -Austin Lorch ‘18, mechanical engineering

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New Student Guide 21

S The Engineering Senior Design Clinic is one of the best experiences you will have as a St. Thomas engineering student. This two-semester course is a critical component of the St. Thomas engineering curriculum. It requires student teams to engage hands-on with real-world engineering problems. Students are challenged to create a novel solution to engineering problems posed by an organization. You and your team of fellow students work face to face with engineers and business unit leaders from your organization sponsor. You will take the project from the concept to a working prototype or design. The teams frequently come up with new intellectual property as a part of the projects, which occasionally includes patents. Senior engineering students choose what they want to work on for the year from a range of project options. Some students want to be paired with a big company while others want the experience of working with a start-up. Still others may choose experiential global learning as a part of their research. It all ends with an afternoon to show off your work to family, friends, faculty and industry leaders. enior Design Clinic

It was a lot of work but incredibly rewarding. All the engineers here are very grateful for this real- world experience … and the chance to have an impact outside of St. Thomas while we’re still here. -Emily Whitwam ‘18, mechanical engineering

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New Student Guide 23

G etting help is EASY

YOUR FACULTY ADVISER You will be amazed at how much your engineering adviser can help. Each engineering student is assigned a faculty adviser who is a full-time engineering professor. Make a point of meeting with your adviser to plan your future or get help with any issues you may have. ACADEMIC COUNSELING This center offers college survival skills, test-taking prep, one-on-one tutoring and help navigating the curriculum or transferring credits, and the best ways to work with your professors. (651) 962-6300, Murray-Herrick Campus Center (MHC), Room 110. Drop in anytime, 8 a.m.–4:30 p.m., Monday-Friday. CAREER DEVELOPMENT CENTER (CDC)

The CDC can help you with writing your resume or looking for a job, internship or graduate school. Both students and alumni can get help here. (651) 962-6761, Murray-Herrick Campus Center, Room 123.

THREE TIPS FOR SUCCESS

MATHEMATICS RESOURCES CENTER (MaRC) The MaRC has drop in times from 9:30 a.m.–7:30 p.m. Monday–Thursday; 9:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m. Friday; and 6 p.m.–9 p.m. Sunday. Get help with math, including calculus. (651) 962-5529, O’Shaughnessy Science Hall (OSS), Room 235. COUNSELING AND PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES If school or life is stressing you out, free services are available to help you. You can check out online audio relaxation exercises or mental health apps, or obtain counseling to work toward a better understanding of difficulties you are having. (651) 952-6750, 35 South Finn Street (between Summit and Grand avenues) (651) 952-6750. stthomas.edu/counseling COMPUTER LABS Many computer labs are found around campus, including in the Frey Science and Engineering Center. Hours vary by lab. Other resources include 3-D printers, computer projection, research labs and more.

Talk to Your Adviser. A key to success is to develop a strong relationship with your adviser. Be sure to discuss your long-term goals and dreams, as well as which classes to take and when to take them. Act Before Problems Get Too Big. The best thing to do if you have a problem is to seek help from your fellow students, your professor, your adviser, Academic Counseling, or Counseling and Psychological Services before a problem gets too big. Make Time for Yourself. The engineering curriculum can be stressful. Reward yourself for the hours of studying with some of your favorite activities … sports, music or hanging out with friends.

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AIR FORCE RESERVE OFFICER TRAINING CORPS The University of St. Thomas is proud to be the host to Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) Detachment 410 and the Department of Aerospace Studies, recognized as one of the best in the country and offering a top-ranked subsidy program. AFROTC is a commissioning program designed to prepare students to assume positions of leadership and responsibility in the United States Air Force directly after graduation. Murray-Herrick Campus Center, LL4, afrotc410@stthomas.edu or (651) 962-6320 stthomas.edu/afrotc VETERANS RESOURCE CENTER Veterans and military-affiliated family members have a special place at St. Thomas. Literally. Our Veterans Resource Center offers veterans the resources they need to succeed academically and the career support they need to thrive after their time at St. Thomas. If you’re a veteran, you may be entitled to benefits from a variety of programs to assist with educational expenses. Post 9/11 GI Bill recipients who are entitled to the maximum Chapter 33 benefit rate (100%) may be eligible to participate in the Yellow Ribbon program at St. Thomas. St. Thomas provides an unlimited number of awards to undergraduate and graduate engineering students. M ILITARY PROGRAMS

Murray-Herrick Campus Center, LL17, veteranservices@stthomas.edu or (651) 962-6333, Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.–4:30 p.m. stthomas.edu/veterans

Cadet Lucas Manke ’20, mechanical engineering major, Army ROTC top cadet in the nation, University Innovation Fellow, 4.0 GPA, member of swim and dive team

Cadet Savannah Johnson ’20, mechanical engineering major, first-ever recipient of the Secretary of the Air Force Leadership Award, Air Force Outstanding Cadet of the Year Award, Society of American Military Engineers (SAME) Award of Merit

Faculty

Mr. Steve Albers albe8983@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5750

Dr. John Abraham jpabraham@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5766

Dr. Katherine Acton kacton@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5753

Dr. Deb Besser bess8866@stthomas.edu (651) 962-7741

Dr. Sarah Baxter scbaxter@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5507

Mr. Robert Bach, P.E. jrbach@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5510

Dr. Genevieve Gagnon gagn5892@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5774

Dr. David Forliti dforliti@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5415

Dr. Camille George cmgeorge@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5553

Dr. Jennifer Holte jholte@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5763

Dr. Michael Hennessey mphennessey@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5659

Dr. Chris Haas haas5473@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5750

Dr. Mahmoud Kabalan mahmoud.kabalan

Dr. Lucas Koerner koerner.lucas@stthomas.edu (651) 962-7742

Dr. Jeffrey Jalkio jajalkio@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5754

@stthomas.edu (651) 962 5598

Dr. Tiffany Ling ling1596@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5479

Dr. Rita Lederle rita.lederle@stthomas.edu (651) 962-7745

Dr. Cheol-Hong Min cmin@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5866

Dr. Brittany Nelson- Cheeseman bbnelsonchee@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5773

Dr. Greg Mowry gsmowry@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5749

Dr. Bob Mahmoodi mahm3256@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5750

Dr. Hassan Salamy hsalamy@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5758

Mr. Brian Plourde bdplourde@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5750

Dr. Kundan Nepal kundan.nepal@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5518

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Dr. Thomas Shepard thomas.shepard@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5433

Dr. AnnMarie Thomas apthomas@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5761

Dr. Tom Secord seco6437@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5406

Dr. John Wentz john.wentz@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5413

Dr. Travis Welt welt7618@stthomas.edu (651) 962-7743

Dr. Don Weinkauf dhweinkauf@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5760

Dick Wold rcwold@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5413

Dr. Jeong Ho You you03039@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5414

Dr. Chong Xu chong.xu@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5439

Staff

Steve Cole Mechanical engineering lab manager scole@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5762

Michael Fink Computer systems administrator mfink@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5759

Kathleen Hauser Web manager kmhauser@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5501

Curt Kietzer Director of development, kiet1596@stthomas.edu (651) 962-6913

Jodea Johnson Computer systems administrator john9280@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5490

Eric Kallas Engineering librarian epkallas@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5013

Charlie Mossey Mechanical engineering lab coordinator cmossey @stthomas.edu (651) 962-5517

Jacki Kubal Executive administrative assistant jkkubal@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5748

Veronica Putzier Faculty coordinator putz6298@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5418

Marius Tegomoh Computer systems administrator mntegomoh@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5517

Andrew Tubesing Electrical engineering lab manager tubesing@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5437

Jennifer Rogers Career services jbkaysen@stthomas.edu (651) 962-6762

Susan Zarambo Marketingmanager zara6490@stthomas.edu (651) 962-5504

New Student Guide 27

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING

University of St. Thomas School of Engineering OSS 100

2115 Summit Ave. St. Paul, MN 55105 (651) 962-5750

stthomas.edu/engineering engineering@stthomas.edu @UST_Engineering

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O’Shaughnessy Science Hall (School of Engineering)

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Owens Science Hall

Facilities and Design Center

Binz

Anderson Parking Facility

Loras Hall

Anderson Student Center

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9

Anderson Athletic and Recreation Complex

9 Murray-Herrick Campus Center 10 O’Shaughnessy-Frey Library

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The University of St. Thomas is an equal opportunity educator and employer. St. Thomas does not unlawfully discriminate, in any of its programs or activities, on the basis of race, color, creed, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, family status, disability, age, marital status, status with regard to public assistance, membership or activity in a local commission, genetic information or any other characteristic protected by applicable law. The University of St. Thomas is registered with the Minnesota Office of Higher Education pursuant to sections 136A.61 to 136A.71. Registration is not an endorsement of the institution. Credits earned at the institution may not transfer to all other institutions.

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stthomas.edu/eostatement

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